Hidden behind Brighton’s main shopping road is an otherworldly neighbourhood with the power to stop and transport even the busiest person in their tracks. It’s known as Cliftonville and it’s where you’ll find some of the most stunning architecture in the city. I stumbled on it by accident when I first moved to Brighton, and couldn’t believe my eyes.

All those whitewashed Regency villas, the shuttered windows, copper canopies, Art Deco-style ironwork; this is the Brighton I imagine all those wealthy Victorians came to, to escape the London smog.

I’ve cycled past it along Upper North Road so many times, always in a hurry on my way somewhere, telling myself next time I’ll stop for a proper walk around. So this weekend with spring finally in the air, and now a blog to document my discoveries on, I decided once and for all to explore the area I’ve decided to nickname, the Notting Hill of Brighton. Follow me…

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To follow my route, check my map of Montpelier Terrace and its surrounding treasures…

It’s also very close to this museum of curiosities in a shopwindow which you can read all about here.

Psst.: Discover the tiny plant shop hidden inside a vintage clothes store in Brighton.
Pssst. A guide to Brighton’s hidden streets.

7 Comments

  1. I love the one with semi-circle canopies…so so beautiful. I wonder how many are still the same grand houses they once were, and how many are now flats? What would a house like that cost?! We have beautiful architecture in Sydney, but truly nothing as lovely as this 🙂

  2. I think honestly most of the properties I snapped are still houses, except those in Powis Square where I spotted the camper van. I think a lot of those are flats. Re the scooter – it's a new addition – a PX125!

  3. Dagging… Wonderful word for those pointy wooden slates. Learnt it from Nigel richardson's GEM of a book, Breakfast in Brighton.

  4. Wonderful area. My fave pic is the one showing the Clifton Terrace sign between 2 windows, because it's a great shot of the 'dragging' that these houses are famous for. I learnt this word for the dangling pointed wooden slats from a favourite book: Breakfast in Brighton, by Nigel Richardson. I can't recommend it highly enough! SUCH a magical read.

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